The paths to "Eureka" moments: Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Education

Posts tagged ‘Learning Expectations’

Teacher Observation #2: Ms. K

Teacher Observation #2: Ms. K

12442583961705917736smiley eyes.svg.medSpecial Education Teacher Ms. K is a true example of teaching through organized instruction and creating a safe learning environment.

Ms. K has an established classroom routine each day. The schedule is written on a board near the front of the room:

1.  10 Minute Warm-up Exercise

2.  Vocabulary Review

3.  Lesson

4.  3 Minute Break

5.  Individual Practice

6.  3 Minute Break

By strictly following this schedule, Ms. K’s students can be at ease throughout the day, knowing what is ahead and what they are to be doing at all times. The vocabulary words, learning goal, and examples given during the “lesson” period of the day are all to be written down in their personal journals. This expectation is the same every day so that students are familiar with what they need to do in order to be successful. These journals, along with all worksheets and warm-up exercises, are kept in personal files that are set out on their desks prior to each class period and then collected at the end. Collecting the students’ work each day eliminate the possibility of forgetting or misplacing important documents in between periods or leaving items at home. In this way, the focus is on academic learning and students are able to devote their energies to the subjects being taught without worrying about paperwork details. 

Organization and classroom management meet through Ms. K’s ticket jar system. When students are demonstrating positive behavior in staying on task, Ms. K gives them a ticket which they then write their names on and place in the ticket jar. On Friday’s Ms. K draws a ticket from the jar and awards the winner with a prize. The more positive behavior displayed, the more chances students have of winning. Rewards become large-scale (class wide parties) when entire class periods demonstrate positive behavior and excellent study skills. Classes that accomplish this get a star on the chart in the back of the room. The class with the most stars at the end of the month wins a party!

Along the same classroom management theme, Ms. K creates a safe and learning conducive environment with her classroom decor, atmosphere,  and posting of classroom expectations. Soft Christmas lights line the wall space above her large window on the far side of the room. Seasonal decor embellish plain tables and counter spaces as well as empty windows. Colorful posters and student work are neatly displayed on most walls. As Ms. K has gotten to know her students, she has asked their preferences on noise levels and light brightness. As a result, some classes have music playing softly during warm-up exercises and individual work times. Other classes have the lights dimmed during individual work time. Accommodations like these are class specific and only changed when students can come to agreements on what they want their learning spaces to be like.  Students continue to take ownership for their environment by determining their own classroom expectations and then writing them on posters which hang on the front wall. Expectations like, “Listen to others” and “Ask Questions” are phrased positively and encourage students to engage in the classroom.

Ms. K’s organization and classroom management techniques have given her students the freedom and comfort of learning in a safe space that promotes their specific learning preferences. I hope to implement similar strategies in my own classroom so as to encourage students to take ownership of their own learning and promote academic growth.

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Classroom Management

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Here is my Classroom Management Plan.

America’s Teachers, Chapter 8

“Sorting” Students

Students can be sorted by ability in academics, preference of educational focus, geographical location, career goals, and age. Sorting of students is often used to put them in project or activity groups. This is best done when groups are equal, working cooperatively and not competitively.

Differences between Expectations

In public high schools in 2005, it was found that while 70 percent of upper and upper-middle class students were enrolled in college preparatory classes, only 25 percent of lower-working class students were taking those same classes. Conversely, there were no students of the upper and upper-middle class students enrolled in “track three” classes, yet 20 percent of lower-working class students took “track-three” classes (Newman 273).  These statistics are the reason many educators assume lower-class students should automatically place lower than upper-class students.

Tracking

As a home school student, I was not subjected to many forms of “tracking” in elementary or secondary school. I did work through several courses which were defined as “Advanced Placement (AP)” courses or “College Prep”. These courses, specifically calculus, biology, and chemistry were slightly more advanced and work intensive than the general courses in their respective subject. Through sports in the local public middle and high schools, I observed several of my peers and their involvement in “tracking” programs. One specific program I recall was called “foundations”. This was simply a euphemism for a repeated pre-algebra course in high school. Students in this class recognized their “failure” and assumed that they were not smart because of their enrollment.

Race or Ethnicity

In understanding students, ethnicity is far more significant than race. In knowing a student’s race, I simply am able to observe the color of his or her skin. However, if I am knowledgeable of the student’s ethnicity, I will understand his or her cultural background. This information is much more useful to me as a teacher. When I know that John is Hispanic American, I will better understand the traditions he and his family may participate in, as well as consider his abilities with the English language if any initial concerns arise. If I know that Cindy is Japanese American, I will better understand her social behaviors as well as her home expectations. Individually, knowing a student’s ethnicity will not answer all of my questions or concerns. Not all children from a certain ethnicity will behave in a manner considered the ethnic norm or generalization. Yet, by having a basic understanding of different ethnic cultures, I will be able to better know my students.

Segregation

The most common form of segregation that I have observed in schools has been that of De Facto. Students simply are attracted to people similar to themselves. In my years at Olympic College, the black students in my classes always sat together, even if they had never met before the first class date. A similar example is found in cultural segregation. Students who appeared to be from “the ghetto” sat next to each other, while those who came from the suburban more preppy areas also tended to group together. In both examples, students chose segregation. However, each group was represented in the larger class and interacted regularly with the other groups and benefited from cooperative learning.

Bilingual Education

Bilingual education is controversial because educators and the government are continually trying to close the achievement gap between English Language Learners (ELL’s), and those who already speak English as their first language. Basically, those with English as their first language are able to outperform ELL students to such a degree, that educators recognize that a change must be made. There are four types of bilingual education that educators have experimented with:  immersion, English as a Second Language (ESL), transitional bilingual, and bilingual/bicultural maintenance. Immersion places ELL students in the traditional classroom for the entire school day, though the teachers often speak a bit slower for better understanding. English as a Second language has ELL’s in the traditional classroom for part of the day, and then “pulls them out” to go to a special class with certified teachers in ESL to for the other part of the day. Traditional bilingual education  require bilingual teachers to work directly with ELL students to help them move along in the traditional classroom setting. The last method, bilingual/bicultural maintenance teaches all children two languages. There is still much controversy over this issue as no one method has been found to completely close the achievement gap.

Role in Gender Equity

As a teacher, it is my role to assist in closing the gender gap and maintaining gender equity in my classroom and school. This will occur through equal scoring, praising, and attention given to students. As a math teacher, I will encourage both boys and girls toward success in my classroom. It is my belief, that any student, regardless of gender, can learn the basics of algebra, trigonometry and geometry if they are willing to put forth the effort to learn. It will be my role to teach by example. I will equally respect both peers and superiors of both gender not only because it is the right philosophy to have, but because I am an example to my students through my life.

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Citation

Newman, J.W. (2006). America’s teachers: an introduction to education. White Plains, N.Y.: Allyn & Bacon.