The paths to "Eureka" moments: Teaching Mathematics in Secondary Education

Posts tagged ‘Leadership’

E3-Exemplify and understanding of professional responsibilities and policies.

E3-Exemplify and understanding of professional responsibilities and policies.

Teacher candidates demonstrate knowledge of professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities and policies.

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As a student teacher, I have had the opportunity to act as facilitator at a math department meeting. With this responsibility, I collaborated with my mentor teacher to create the meeting schedule. Throughout the department meeting, I introduced faculty and provided necessary transitions as it progressed.

 

Attached is the department meeting schedule (without names for confidentiality).

Math Department Meeting Agenda

Throughout the meeting, I demonstrated professional respect and consideration by enforcing department norms as well as contributing to the different discussions. I learned the importance of trust and mutual respect among faculty as well as the reasons for department norms and meeting organization. In the future, I hope to be an instrumental member of a math department by being prepared and abiding by department norms.

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Student Choice! Stations Lesson

H1-Honor student diversity and development.

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Teacher-candidates plan and/or adapt learner centered curricula that engages students in a variety of culturally responsive, developmentally, and age appropriate strategies.

As a teacher, the content I teach must be accessible to all students of diverse learning profiles, readiness levels, and interests.

On the fifth day of our Algebra unit on functions, I decided to do a stations activity. The stations were designed to allow students to work on various ways of working with functions. The activity enabled students to choose the areas where they felt they needed additional practice.

Functions day 5

The stations were:

1)    Domain/Range: Worksheets with multiple ways of representing given information.

2)    Input/Output: Worksheets with many different functions and problems where students are asked to find either specific inputs or outputs.

3)    Graphing: Students are given several related functions (shifted along either the x or y-axis) and asked to graph them on different coordinate planes. (See graph paper)

DomainRange Worksheet     function_output      graphing_coordinate_plane 

As with other workdays, students were encouraged to work collaboratively and use dry-erase markers on their tables to demonstrate their work. “Go-to” people were designated at each station as peer leaders to whom students could direct questions before asking me.

After the stations activity a differentiated quiz was given to all students. The quiz had two versions based on student readiness level. The only difference between the quizzes was the complexity of the math involved; the function content was the same. Prior to giving the quiz,  I explained why I was giving two different quizzes. “Those who showed an understanding of functions (based on pre-assessment) receive a quiz with more complex math as well as functional notation. This is to challenge each student, not to label one group “smart” and another “dumb”. All students received the same type of questions, just different levels of math complexity.”

Functions Quiz 1   Functions Quiz 2

This lesson was planned so as to be learner centered. It allowed students to work with the content in a variety of ways and from multiple perspectives. Students were able to work collaboratively- challenging each student in a developmental way. Finally, the quiz was given in such a way as to give each student the opportunity to succeed and demonstrate their academic knowledge.

In creating this lesson I was able to grow in my understanding of how to differentiate instruction and assessments. I focused on individual student readiness levels and was able to formatively assess where students had strengths and weaknesses. By giving students the choice of which stations to work at, they were responsible for their own learning and quiz preparation.

In the future, I will continue to strive to make my lessons student-centered, differentiating my instruction to meet students where they are at developmentally.

Service Learning Project

One of the requirements in my Introduction to Education class was to participate in a service learning project. My own experience took place at Coe Elementary School in a 3rd grade classroom. I was an aid to the teacher once a week for a total of 21 hours.

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Below is a paper written describing how this experience has changed my understanding of the four pillars: Service, Leadership, Competency, and Character.

Service Learning Paper: Where I Was and Where I Am Going

As I reflect upon my time spent at Coe Elementary during my service learning hours, I am able to compare my initial understanding of how service, leadership, competence, and character, are seen in the classroom, to my previous understanding.

On the first day of Intro to Education, I wrote the following four definitions as they apply in the classroom setting. First, service is observed in a classroom when the teacher understands that teaching is not about his/herself, but about the student. A service minded teacher will make sacrifices for the students to promote better learning. Secondly, leadership is demonstrated when the teacher leads the class both instructionally and as an example. A leader recognizes the skills of those who follow him/her, and seeks to enhance those skills. Thirdly, a teacher seeks to promote competence – the ability to understand the subject matter. This involves problem solving and not simply memory recall. Fourth and finally, a teacher develops character in the classroom. Responsibility, integrity, and creativity are all elements important to education.

After having spent eight weeks in a third grade classroom, my views have become enhanced by the experiences I have had and the interactions I have observed.

As a teacher, service not only takes place inside the classroom, but in the community and among educational faculty. This can take the form of anything from an after school program like refereeing a student football game, to spending hours at night working on prepping for an in-class Mother’s Day project. A leader in the classroom knows the abilities of the students. A leader is able to multi-task, teaching new information to the entire class, but also providing individual feedback to students, asking them questions and challenging them at a personal level.

A competent teacher not only knows the subject matter to be taught, but knows it well enough to teach excellently. In order to ensure competence, a good teacher will continue their own education. This may be pursued by working to get a higher degree or through attending educational conferences and classes. Teachers must also promote competence within their classrooms. One way I observed this being accomplished in the third grade classroom was through peer discussions. Students explained to their neighbors what they had learned and their partners either added to or disagreed with what the first student had said. In this way, students were getting immediate feedback as well as demonstrating their understanding of the topic. Finally, character should be demonstrated by the teacher and encouraged within the student body. Teachers can be the example in character, by teaching “to the student”, not the test, and having organized lessons for efficient time management. Teachers can also encourage moral character within the student body through classroom policies and school-wide programs. Respect is one characteristic that must be shown to students in order for them to follow the rest. When teachers have the respect of their students, other important traits such as integrity, trust, and responsibility will follow.

As I conclude my volunteering at Coe Elementary, I plan to continue learning and growing in the four areas of service, leadership, competence, and character. In service, I will grow as I serve as the Sports Ministry Coordinator for Youth Missions International. Through Y.M.I. I will have the opportunity to work at sports camps, coaching elementary and middle school children. While the academic quarter continues, I will seek to serve my peers and colleagues here at S.P.U, striving to live a service-minded lifestyle on and off campus. As a staff leader with Y.M.I, I am constantly being challenged to grow in leadership skills. One particular challenge is how to assign volunteer leaders to the different camps in the Northwest. As the coordinator, I must assess the abilities and gifts of the volunteers and place them where they will work best. I will continue to grow in competence as I finish out my mathematics major and secondary education program here at S.P.U., but my education will not stop here. After I have graduated with my B.A, I will continue to learn about my field and how to be a better teacher. This will most likely take the form of a Masters degree. As a Christian, my education of character is never complete here on earth. As I continue in these last few years at SPU, and look forward to my career as a teacher, I will mold my character after the Greatest Teacher.